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Friday, July 21, 2017

2825 - AMICOR 20

NCDs—why are we failing?

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 2 horas
Offline: NCDs—why are we failing? Richard HortonEmail the author Richard Horton Published: 22 July 2017 *Selecionado pela AMICOR Maria Inês Reinert Azambuja* - Why is the global health community failing to respond effectively to the rising burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs)? The answer can be summed up in one word—fear. Fear of a species-threatening pandemic. A pervasive fear that has displaced all other health concerns. Anxiety among political elites is causing a recalibration of priorities among global health leaders. In his first speech to staff in Geneva this month, W... mais »

Simone Veil (1927-2017)

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 2 horas
Simone Veil Barbara Casassus Published: 22 July 2017 [image: Opens large image] Susana Vera/Reuters View Large Image Former French Health Minister and architect of the law legalising abortion in France. Born in Nice, France, on July 13, 1927, she died at home in Paris, France, on June 30, 2017, aged 89 years. “I forgive you for having poured water over my head”, might seem an unlikely accolade from a 69-year-old man when paying tribute to his mother at an official ceremony with full state honours. But this is exactly what happened when Simone Veil's eldest son Jean Veil took the podium... mais »

Microbiome

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 20 horas
THE MICROBIOME -- 7/20/17 - 0 COMMENTS *Today's encore selection -- from "Microbiomics: The Next Big Thing?" by Lisa J. Bain.* It is estimated that we each have 10 trillion of our own cells, accompanied by an even greater 100 trillion "good" bacterial cells. These bacterial cells, along with assorted viruses, fungi and other microbes, collectively constitute what is often referred to as the *microbiome*. Researchers now believe the microbiome is essential for the proper functioning of the body -- and that antibiotics often deplete the microbiome, impairing body function and c... mais »

AD' Blood test

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há um dia
Blood Test Identifies Key Alzheimer’s Markerby Neuroscience News Researchers have devised a new blood test that can detect if amyloid had begun to accumulate in the brain. The test help physicians diagnose Alzheimer's disease in a cheaper, less invasive way than currently available. The researchers will present their findings at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London. Read more of this post *Neuroscience News* | July 19, 2017 at 11:16 am | Tags: amyloid beta 38, amyloid beta 40, amyloid-beta, blood test, WUSTL | URL: http://wp.me/p4sXNK-aZa Comment See all c... mais »

AD and Omega3

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 2 dias
Could Omega 3 Fatty Acids Help Treat Alzheimer’s? [image: Neuroscience News]NEUROSCIENCE NEWSJULY 18, 2017 F *Summary: Researchers shed new light on how DHA, a key essential Omega-3 fatty acid, could help promote cell survival and contribute to treating Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease and stoke.* *Source: LSU.* *Understanding how dietary essential fatty acids work may lead to effective treatments for diseases and conditions such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, age-related macular degeneration, Parkinson’s disease and other retinal and neurodegenerative diseases. The key is to be able ... mais »

Avenida Tênis Clube - Santa Maria -100 anos

José Antonio BrenneremBrenner de Santa Maria - Há 2 dias
Este dia 18 de julho de 2017 marca o centenário do Avenida Tênis Clube, fundado por um grupo de moças santa-marienses, várias delas recém-saídas do internato em colégios de Porto Alegre. Em uma reunião das jovens amigas, em janeiro de 1917, no palacete residencial do médico Astrogildo de Azevedo, intendente municipal e pai de uma delas, Aracy Pinto de Azevedo, elas planejavam sobre o que fazer na pequena Santa Maria de cerca de 15.000 habitantes. Haviam terminado os estudos e não mais voltariam aos colégios da capital. Foi então que uma das jovens, Stellita Mariense de Campos, teve um... mais »

Para o "Ministro da Saúde"

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 2 dias
[image: Logo AMRIGS email mkt] *NOTA DA ASSOCIAÇÃO MÉDICA DO RIO GRANDE DO SUL* A Associação Médica do Rio Grande do Sul (AMRIGS), ao longo de sua história associativista, tem pautado seu trabalho em prol do conhecimento científico. Seus associados se destacam em um exercício medico sério e altamente competente. Assim sendo, a AMRIGS sente-se autorizada e responsável em refutar com veemência as declarações do ministro da Saúde em relação aos médicos brasileiros. É uma declaração com visão parcial e superficial que se generaliza para toda uma classe. Responsabilizar os médicos pelos ... mais »

Direitos na Cidade Mercado

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 3 dias
Observatório das Metrópoles Núcleo Porto Alegre 23:44 (Há 8 horas) para demouramartins, azevedotiesca, fskieling, Gustavo, jose.gomes, liviosilvadeol., Bianca, Vanessa, Lisiane, jmolivar, Daniel, solismarfm, sucaveleda, cesarmartinsd, Heleniza, Nanashara, alohamarcel, janart, alicerauber, danisanoh, MILTON, rovarq, Viviane, Alexandre, Ana Boa noite... Segue abaixo a divulgação de um importante evento. Contamos com a presença de todos. *CONVITE* O Coletivo A Cidade Que Queremos - Porto Alegre convida para discussão sobre o Plano Diretor de Desenvolvimento Urbano Ambiental (PDDUA) e... mais »

Living with Death

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 4 dias
How to Live with DeathPsychoanalyst Adam Phillips on how Darwin and Freud reframed our mortality as an organizing principle of human life.BY MARIA POPOVA [image: How to Live with Death] Our lifelong struggle to learn how to live is inseparable from two facts only: that of our mortality and that of our dread of it, dread with an edge of denial. Half a millennium ago — a swath of time strewn with the lives and deaths of everyone who came before us — Montaigne captured this paradox in his magnificent meditation on death and the art of living: “To lament that we shall not be alive a hund... mais »

Elovanoids

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - Há 5 dias
*Newly Discovered Elovanoids Called a 'Transformative New Concept of Biology'* Elovanoids are the first bioactive chemical messengers made from omega-3 very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC-PUFAs,n-3) that are released in response to cell injury or when cells are confronted with adversities for survival. This discovery provides the first evidence of the existence of elovanoids and of their significant role in protecting and sustaining retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and photoreceptor cell survival. The research is in *Scientific Reports*. (full open access)

NCDs—why are we failing?

Why is the global health community failing to respond effectively to the rising burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs)? The answer can be summed up in one word—fear. Fear of a species-threatening pandemic. A pervasive fear that has displaced all other health concerns. Anxiety among political elites is causing a recalibration of priorities among global health leaders. In his first speech to staff in Geneva this month, WHO's new Director-General, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, named four urgent issues: health emergencies; universal health coverage; women's, children's, and adolescents’ health; and climate change. NCDs, the cause of 71% of the world's deaths, were absent from his list. In an address to G20 leaders just a few days later, Tedros underlined the importance of “pandemics, health emergencies, and weak health systems”. He was silent again on the 39·8 million deaths annually from NCDs. In his speech to health ministers at this year's World Health Assembly, he did call NCDs “a perfect storm”. By contrast, his predecessor, Margaret Chan, in a valedictory summing up of her decade as Director-General, observed that the growing importance of NCDs was “the trend that most profoundly reshaped the mindset of public health”. She was correct. But her diagnosis seems not to be shared by her successor.
 Opens large image

Michael Coyne/National Geographic/Getty Images
The 2011 Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of NCDs urged presidents and prime ministers to take chronic diseases much more seriously. A plethora of strategies, action plans, and status reports before and since have emphasised the importance of NCDs as a cause of premature mortality. Today, NCDs are embedded in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 3.4). Civil society mobilisation has benefited from a rejuvenated NCD Alliance. The knowledge base for policy action has never been better. Global awareness is high. And there is even a political mechanism to exploit—a third High-Level Meeting on NCDs to be held in September, 2018. Yet even those who led efforts to secure a Political Declaration admit that progress has been inadequate and disappointingly slow. Countries are struggling. There is little money available. Health systems are still too weak to deliver quality services. Nobody has been able to articulate how NCDs fit into the call for universal health coverage. An advocacy strategy based on four diseases and four risk factors seems increasingly out of touch with the realities in poor countries. Many political leaders believe that NCDs are just too big and too complex a challenge. And so they are paralysed. We need a different approach.
 Opens large image

BSIP/UIG Via Getty Images
Recently, I listened to a senior adviser to the Global Fund set out the lessons to be learned from the Fund's success in winning the confidence of donors to invest billions of dollars in AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. First, translate your evidence into clear and simple political (not technical) messages. Second, articulate why you need money—what exactly will you spend it on and what will be the results of that investment? Third, break down your broad global demands into tangible country-specific needs. And finally, connect your case to the big political picture—give it meaning. For NCDs, the issue is one of framing. For the Political Declaration, that frame was the adverse effects of NCDs on development. It is an argument that has survived into the SDG era. But it is not enough. Given the deep fears and anxieties of political leaders, those seeking greater action on NCDs should consider the frame of global health security. The argument is compelling. The overall objective? Global health security. How? Individual health security. The means? Universal health coverage. The place of NCDs? There can be no security without making NCDs fundamental to the vision for universal health coverage. There are several additional lessons to consider. Learn from the AIDS movement. Access to medicines for NCDs should be a decisive matter of human rights. Talk the language of heads of state—investing in the prevention and treatment of NCDs is good for economic growth. Link the case against NCDs to major social movements, such as climate action and the resultant health cobenefits. Build new alliances, especially with the child and adolescent health community. Strengthen accountability. Take communication more seriously. Be human. Be specific. Be vivid. Because if a radical course correction is not made within the next 12 months, the global goal of controlling some of the biggest killers in the world today will not be achieved.
 Opens large image

Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images
 Opens large image

LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images

Simone Veil (1927-2017)

Susana Vera/Reuters
Former French Health Minister and architect of the law legalising abortion in France. Born in Nice, France, on July 13, 1927, she died at home in Paris, France, on June 30, 2017, aged 89 years.
“I forgive you for having poured water over my head”, might seem an unlikely accolade from a 69-year-old man when paying tribute to his mother at an official ceremony with full state honours. But this is exactly what happened when Simone Veil's eldest son Jean Veil took the podium on July 5 at Les Invalides, where Napoleon lies, shortly before French President Emmanuel Macron spoke in homage to one of France's modern-day heroes. Praising her strong character, Jean recalled the occasion when his mother emptied a carafe of water over his head in disgust at what she considered to be his misogynist remarks./.../

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Microbiome

THE MICROBIOME -- 7/20/17

Today's encore selection -- from "Microbiomics: The Next Big Thing?" by Lisa J. Bain. It is estimated that we each have 10 trillion of our own cells, accompanied by an even greater 100 trillion "good" bacterial cells. These bacterial cells, along with assorted viruses, fungi and other microbes, collectively constitute what is often referred to as the microbiome. Researchers now believe the microbiome is essential for the proper functioning of the body -- and that antibiotics often deplete the microbiome, impairing body function and causing maladies:
"Although it may sound weird, unappealing, even disgusting, fecal transplantation has piqued the interest of gastroenterologists and infectious disease specialists around the world. Meanwhile, patients suffering from severe diarrhea are demanding the procedure and the FDA has weighed in with restrictions on how this 'unapproved therapy' can be delivered.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

AD' Blood test

Blood Test Identifies Key Alzheimer’s Marker

by Neuroscience News
Researchers have devised a new blood test that can detect if amyloid had begun to accumulate in the brain. The test help physicians diagnose Alzheimer's disease in a cheaper, less invasive way than currently available. The researchers will present their findings at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London.
Comment   See all comments

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

AD and Omega3

Could Omega 3 Fatty Acids Help Treat Alzheimer’s?

Summary: Researchers shed new light on how DHA, a key essential Omega-3 fatty acid, could help promote cell survival and contribute to treating Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease and stoke.
Source: LSU.
Understanding how dietary essential fatty acids work may lead to effective treatments for diseases and conditions such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, age-related macular degeneration, Parkinson’s disease and other retinal and neurodegenerative diseases. The key is to be able to intervene during the early stages of the disease. That is the conclusion of a Minireview by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director, and Aram Asatryan, PhD, postdoctoral researcher, at the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry‘s Thematic Minireview Series: Inflammatory transcription confronts homeostatic disruptions.

Para o "Ministro da Saúde"


Direitos na Cidade Mercado

Observatório das Metrópoles Núcleo Porto Alegre

23:44 (Há 8 horas)
para demouramartinsazevedotiescafskielingGustavojose.gomesliviosilvadeol.BiancaVanessaLisianejmolivarDanielsolismarfmsucaveledacesarmartinsdHelenizaNanasharaalohamarceljanartalicerauberdanisanohMILTONrovarqVivianeAlexandreAna
Boa noite... Segue abaixo a divulgação de um importante evento. Contamos com a presença de todos.

CONVITE

O Coletivo A Cidade Que Queremos - Porto Alegre convida para discussão sobre  o Plano Diretor de Desenvolvimento Urbano Ambiental (PDDUA) e o Conselho Municipal de Desenvolvimento Urbano Ambiental (CMDUA) de Porto Alegre.

A atividade acontecerá no dia 22 de julho de 2017, entre 13h30 e 18h, no SIMPA (Rua João Alfredo, 61 - Cidade Baixa), conforme programação abaixo.

A  CIDADE MERCADORIA  OU A  CIDADE DE DIREITOS?
Discutindo O Plano Diretor e o Conselho Municipal de Desenvolvimento Urbano  Ambiental - CMDUA - de Porto Alegre

Programação:

13h30 - Abertura
13h45 - Mesa
- A cidade mercadoria ou a cidade de direitos?
- Por que o Plano Diretor?
- Por que o CMDUA?
15h - Intervalo
15h15 - Debates e propostas
18h - Encerramento

Contamos com a participação de todos.

Atenciosamente
Coletivo A Cidade Que Queremos - Porto Alegre




Observatório das Metrópoles

Núcleo Porto Alegre

Campus do Vale/ UFRGS - Prédio 43322 - sala 102


Sunday, July 16, 2017

Living with Death

How to Live with Death

Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips on how Darwin and Freud reframed our mortality as an organizing principle of human life.

How to Live with Death
Our lifelong struggle to learn how to live is inseparable from two facts only: that of our mortality and that of our dread of it, dread with an edge of denial. Half a millennium ago — a swath of time strewn with the lives and deaths of everyone who came before us — Montaigne captured this paradox in his magnificent meditation on death and the art of living: “To lament that we shall not be alive a hundred years hence, is the same folly as to be sorry we were not alive a hundred years ago.” Centuries later, John Updike — a mind closer to our own time but now swept by mortality to the same nonexistence as Montaigne — echoed the sentiment when he wrote: “Each day, we wake slightly altered, and the person we were yesterday is dead, so why… be afraid of death, when death comes all the time?”/.../

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Elovanoids

Newly Discovered Elovanoids Called a 'Transformative New Concept of Biology'

Elovanoids are the first bioactive chemical messengers made from omega-3 very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC-PUFAs,n-3) that are released in response to cell injury or when cells are confronted with adversities for survival. This discovery provides the first evidence of the existence of elovanoids and of their significant role in protecting and sustaining retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and photoreceptor cell survival.

The research is in Scientific Reports. (full open access)